Tag Archives: gintendo

I’ll be streaming Zelda for tonight’s Gintendo!

Yes, Zelda is this week’s big topic. That and Switch, but at the moment most people only care about Switch because of Zelda. Sadly, though, Nintendo won’t let us stream the new one, so in lieu of Breath of the Wild I will instead be streaming the Zelda that will serve as a subject for this week’s Retronauts recording marathon: Link’s Awakening.

(I was going to stream Power Blade today, but we’ll save that for some other time. There are many more streams to come!)

The magic will happen this afternoon at 5 p.m. ET, which is (rumor has it) 2 p.m. PT. You can enjoy the madness on my YouTube channel, per usual.

Will I reach the Wind Fish? (Spoilers: Not even close.)

This will, of course, be the final Gintendo for February! I’ll be out of town for the following week for Game Developers Conference and the aforementioned Retronauts recording weekend, but I’ll hit the ground running once I return. Thanks as always for your support of Retronauts video endeavors… and don’t forget that there’s a Final Fantasy IV episode of the show online and ready for your enjoyment if you support the podcast, too.

Leave a Comment

Filed under Gintendo

Enjoy Bomberman’s most obscure outing with an afternoon live stream

I will once again be taking to the virtual airwaves this afternoon for another Gintendo livestream, this time at 5 p.m. ET (2 p.m. PT). I’ll be playing another pick-up from my trip to Japan, generously donated to the cause by Eric Klein of Kyde and Eric. It’s a little thing called “SameGame.”

That’s sah-meh gah-meh, not same game.

I discovered SameGame the same way I did Puzzle Bobble: By way of a shareware Mac-based ripoff on my university newspaper’s production computers. The real game is much more interesting than that simple clone, though.

Hudson’s SameGame only ever shipped in Japan, for Super Famicom. It came in an unusually oversized cartridge… yet it looks curiously reminiscent of something else. Specifically, if you’re familiar with the Japanese version of the Super Game Boy, it looks almost exactly identical to that cartridge.

And for good reason: Like Super Game Boy, SameGame is a cart within a cart. You can plug expansion packs into the top slot to switch up game elements. By default, it shipped with a Hudson mascot pack, and apparently this standard combo is not particularly in demand — overpriced Akihabara game shop Super Potato was selling this entire setup for a mere ¥180. That’s about a buck-fifty. They did have a couple of expansion packs as well, but those were selling for around $20 apiece… so I decided to go with just the basic pack, thank you very much. Apparently all the expansions really do is allow you to switch graphic to different tile sets, which is not really worth the premium. Besides, the default pak contains Bomberman and Bonk, so they kinda gave away the premium set…

I haven’t been able to find much concrete documentation for SameGame in English, so I have no idea how many jumper paks Hudson created, or what characters and properties they contained. I do know that SameGame was somehow able to connect to Nintendo’s Japan-only Super Famicom online service via the Satellaview, which I think allowed you to upload rankings to a leaderboard.

So, it’s a pretty neat 16-bit curio. It’s also not really that much of a game, so my guess is that I’ll play this for a while and then switch to something more exciting midway through the stream. I have no idea what that’ll be, but I’ll fish something fun out of my fairly respectable Super NES/Super Famicom collection to make it worth your while.

As always, you can witness the stream live and in person on my YouTube channel, or you can watch it later via the stream archive. See you there!

Leave a Comment

Filed under Gintendo

Join me and Simon Belmont this afternoon for a Gintendo stream

Hi everyone, once you’ve savored this week’s super cool episode of the podcast, be sure to tune in for a brand new Gintendo stream. I don’t know if I’ll be able to stream daily this week, but I’ll do my best! Today I’d like to continue with my promise to celebrate Castlevania’s 30th anniversary by taking on the second Castlevania game: Simon’s Quest for NES. Or, possibly, I may try and slug my way through the Japanese version of the game, which appeared on the Famicom Disk System. As I demonstrated in last week’s Retronauts Radio episode, the Japanese “Dracula II” was essentially the same game as Simon’s Quest, all the way down to the infamous lying villagers, but it used the Disk System’s hardware for its soundtrack. It also included really annoying load times. So, if my increasingly cranky Disk System will behave long enough to keep the stream up and running, I will attempt to show off this slightly weird rendition of an old familiar favorite this afternoon… and if not, well, I’ll just play plain ol’ Simon’s Quest. In English.

Either way, the stream begins at 4:30 E.T. this afternoon (that’s 1:30 P.T.), so set some time aside and join me as I try to remember where the heck I’m supposed to go in this open-ended non-linear adventure. I may need your help for advice on where to go next, actually. And I’ll try not to slow down the adventure by grinding out levels in the mansions….

You can view the stream on my YouTube channel, or catch it here on the site once it’s archived.

“I will drink your blood like cherry pop gin and tonic!”

3 Comments

Filed under Gintendo, Video

Gintendo returns with Japanese gin and Japanese mystery games

I had hoped to stream some Gintendo videos from abroad as I traveled through Japan last week collecting interviews for Retronauts, but that didn’t happen; between jet lag, a packed schedule, and the last lingering bits of a cold, I simply wasn’t able to. Don’t worry, though, because I’m going to make up for the disruption with style. Beginning tomorrow, I will be hosting frequent Gintendo streams featuring the games I picked up while in Tokyo (mostly per Patron request).

I’ll kick things off tomorrow at 5 p.m. ET (2 p.m. PT) with a mystery stream:

I will be playing whatever this strange Game Boy cartridge contains. This is a Nintendo Power cartridge, which has nothing to do with the American magazine — rather, it’s a blank rewritable cart that you could take to a convenience store kiosk and load up with inexpensive games. The service has long since become defunct, so carts like this one exist as relics of sort, containing whatever games the last owner happened to have downloaded. There are a couple of pretty cool games on this one, according to the label, so hopefully it still works when I plug it in tomorrow. Join me tomorrow to enjoy the surprise.

Also new for this stream: I picked up the legendary Super Game Boy Commander controller for use with Game Boy World (and related streams). The controller I’ve been using has been a standard Super Famicom controller, which I picked up last time I was in Japan. It was naturally in much better condition than any vintage Super NES controller you’re likely to find here in the U.S… but the controller cable is so short that it’s difficult to use with my office setup. The Commander has a nice lengthy cable, and it’s specifically laid out for use with Game Boy software, so that should be a nice upgrade.

And finally, the gin for the evening will be the very first gin ever distilled in Japan (so far as my research can determine): The Kyoto Distillery’s Ki no Bi (as in “the beauty of seasons,” not as in Obi-wan Kenobi). It debuted back in October, and obviously, I had to acquire a bottle for Gintendo purposes. Big thanks to Retronauts friend Kyle McLain for helping me to track it down!

You can watch the stream Thursday afternoon here or on the YouTube channel.

http://www.youtube.com/c/JeremyParish/live

7 Comments

Filed under Gintendo

Oops, an unannounced Gintendo

Yesterday afternoon we recorded the first episode of Retronauts East, which I desperately hope turns out well — there’s a lot of fine-tuning that needs to happen with our recording setup, so the sound quality could turn out to be kind of awful. I guess we’ll find out! Once we wrapped the recording session, I decided to celebrate the show’s eastward expansion by launching an impromptu and unannounced Gintendo live stream of Castlevania:

Incredibly enough, it went remarkably well. Shockingly well, actually. I aced the two big sticking-point battles on my first go (skip ahead to 16:30 if you want to see the most impressive showing I’ve ever put up versus Frankenstein’s Monster and Igor). Then… the second half of the stream consists of my nerve breaking and me failing abysmally against Dracula’s stage and the final battle, over and over again. It was a pretty solid first half, though! I guess you could blame the gin (Reisetbauer Blue, if you’re curious).

Anyway, it’s here if you’d like to watch it.

I head out of town for a week on Sunday, so I won’t be able to host a normal Gintendo while I’m abroad. Although… I guess there’s technically nothing stopping me from taking along, say, the Retro USB AVS? And an Elgato device? And maybe picking up some random retro Famicom games and playing them? Hmm. If nothing else, I might try and stream a stroll through Akihabara or something, assuming it won’t devastate my international data plan. And I definitely will be posting all throughout next week on my game-shopping and developer-interviewing exploits in Tokyo, so you can at least look forward to that.

(Promo art by Rusty Shackles)

4 Comments

Filed under Gintendo, Retronauts, Video

Gaming loses another giant: Remembering Masaya Nakamura

The Associated Press reported today that Masaya Nakamura has passed away. This isn’t really one of those shocking, out-of-nowhere passings; Nakamura had reached the ripe old age of 91 and seems to have lived a full and successful life.

If you don’t recognize Nakamura’s name immediately, don’t feel too bad about that; he was an executive, not a designer, and few people in that line of work tend to see a lot of recognition among consumers. He had held an honorary position for years, long since having retired from the day-to-day management of his company. But, you will definitely have heard of the company he established: Nakamura Amusement Corporation, or Namco for short.

Nakamura founded Namco in the ’50s, during the same fertile period of Japanese post-war reconstruction that gave us SEGA. Even if you didn’t recognize Nakamura’s name right away, you’ve probably heard the sincerely inspiring story behind Namco’s creation. The company began as a handful of electric kids’ rides on the roof of a department store, for which Nakamura himself provided maintenance and upkeep. From that humble beginning, he built a massive arcade empire, eventually getting into the creation of arcade games rather than merely their distribution. It was a natural fit, and Namco’s distribution network meant their games had an easy in to arcades.

Still, none of that would have amounted to much if not for the fact that Namco produced some of the absolute greatest games of the golden age of arcades. Nakamura didn’t design the games himself, but he nevertheless spent time with each one before release, making sure it was up to standards through exhaustive personal play testing. Compare that to Nintendo’s Hiroshi Yamauchi, who prided himself on never having played a video game. Both men ran incredibly successful game businesses — it’s not hard to imagine that Namco could have become a first-party giant if they had gone the sam route as Nintendo and produced their own console in the early ’80s — but they approached their respective businesses from completely different directions.

Maybe it’s not surprising, in that light, to know that Nakamura and Yamauchi butted heads for a while. Namco had supported Nintendo’s Family Computer pretty much straight out of the gates, porting their arcade classics to the system as one of Nintendo’s first third-party publishers. Pac-ManGalagaMappy, and Tower of Druaga were just a few of the arcade best-sellers that became Famicom best-sellers; in fact, I believe Druaga did even better on consoles than in coin-op form due to its decidedly RPG-esque nature. As Nintendo’s console matured, the company began to tighten restrictions on third parties — including its die-hards. Nakamura reportedly felt ill-used as a result; it wasn’t hard to make the argument that Famicom owed much of its success to the high-quality hits Namco brought to the console, and Japanese business revolves greatly around relationships. For Nintendo to treat such a trusted partner the same as middling latecomers like, say, Bothtec or Towa Chiki… well, that flew in the face of protocol (something Yamauchi was known to do when it suited him).

So, Namco unabashedly pushed back, scaling down their Famicom production and going all-in on NEC’s PC Engine instead. Nakamura also played a key role in the establishment of Atari subsidiary Tengen, which went rogue in the U.S. and published classic games — many from Namco — without a license.

So Nakamura was a pretty cool guy who helped usher essential masterpieces to market and wasn’t afraid to go his own way. A true great of the games industry, and a rare gem of an executive who regarded his company’s creations with a personal passion and commitment to quality.

To honor Nakamura in my own small way, I’ll be streaming some Namco games tomorrow afternoon at 4 p.m. ET/1 p.m. PT. I’ll start with Rolling Thunder and move on from there. I can’t remember which Namco games I have in my library at the moment, so it’ll be a potluck of sorts. Join me and be surprised!

6 Comments

Filed under Gintendo, Retronauts

Weekend Gintendo: Let’s kill some actual Nazis [archived!]

It’s been a pretty hectic weekend between the Lunar New Year and what appears to have been the second of 208 planned weekly protests by millions of anti-Trump demonstrators. Also, somewhere in there, an Analogue Nt Mini showed up on my doorstep, and I’ve been eager to put it through its paces. So I figure, why not combine two very important things — playing video games and a stiff drink to take the edge off — with a Sunday afternoon Gintendo stream?

And friends, I can’t think of a more appropriate game to play this weekend than Bionic Commando ’99.

Bionic Commando… ’99?” you ask, perplexed. Yes, ’99 — it’s Bionic Commando for NES, except this version was patched by Chris Covell (back in the year 1999, hence the name) to restore all the content cut in translation from Japanese to English. Nintendo of America shied away from controversy of any sort in the NES days, which means religious symbols and unpleasant political relics alike had to be modified or scrubbed for U.S. release. The Japanese title of Bionic Commando translated to Top Secret: The Resurrection of Hitler, and an image of ol’ pencil-stache himself glowered over the packaging art as the protagonist gave Fourth Reich soldiers, decked out in full brownshirt regalia, an iron boot to the face.

In America, however, all references to Nazis were edited to “Badds,” and Hitler became “Master-D.” Chris Covell’s patch simply changes back the references and restores certain Nazi imagery, including swastikas, to leave no doubt whatsoever about whom you’re killing. In an era where we have actual Nazis showing up in the national news skulking around under euphemistic terms like “alt-right,” I can think of no more fitting game to play than a game mod that revolves around the premise of calling Nazis by their real name.

So please, join me this afternoon at 4 p.m. ET/1 p.m. PT as I messily explode Hitler’s skull.

Today’s featured gin will be Greenhook Greensmiths’ American Dry, which is distilled in Brooklyn — literally a few miles down the road from JFK International Airport, the site of this weekend’s most fervent pro-immigration protests. And I’ll be playing on an Analogue Nt Mini, a clone of the Japanese NES hardware designed in Seattle. In short, this stream will be celebrating America, inside and out.

2 Comments

Filed under Gintendo, Retronauts, Video

Live streaming tonight: Zelda II for Gintendo

The Gintendo series achieved its funding goal a few days ago, and that means I will be streaming videos now, every week. While imbibing juniper-infused liquors.

To kick off the Gintendo series proper, I’ve decided to go with a game that recently celebrated its 30th anniversary: Zelda II: The Adventure of Link. You know, I don’t think I saw a single retrospective or tribute to the game’s 30th anniversary, which seems a little odd given the attention we all lavished on the original Zelda‘s birthday a year ago. You can attribute that to the fact that its anniversary fell on the weekend that Nintendo was running its global Switch preview events, which basically crowded out other Nintendo-related topics in the hearts of nerds everywhere. Or… perhaps less kindly, you could attribute it to the fact that Zelda II is the least-beloved of all entries in the main series. I will remain neutral on this matter and let you make the judgment yourself.

In any case, I’ll be streaming the game for an hour this afternoon, beginning at 4 p.m. ET/1 p.m. PT:

I do not promise to complete the game, or even to do particularly well at it. I’ve finished it a few times over the years — once when I was young and nimble-fingered, and more recently with 3DS Virtual Console save states — but this game involves a lot of tough combat and unforgiving design. I’ll give it my best, though!

And because this is Gintendo, I’ll be talking about the bottle I just opened: No. 209 Cabernet Reserve, an intriguing gin by a San Francisco-based distiller that spent part of its life aging in cabernet sauvignon barrels and has taken on a rich amber color (and, one assumes, a bit of a wine flavor). Join me for a journey of discovery through Hyrule, and through my cups.

5 Comments

Filed under Gintendo, Video

Live stream [archived]: Donkey Kong ’94 (the Game Boy one)

Update: The stream has ended and you can watch the archived version below! Thanks to all who joined in.

Last week’s Gintendo trial stream seems to have gone over quite well, so I’m going to try another test flight this evening. Several people didn’t like the fact that I had my streaming software set to mute the game audio whenever I spoke, so this time around I’ll see how it goes when I adjust the broadcast to keep the game action audible beneath my mutterings.

The game featured this time around will fall into my Game Boy specialty wheel house: Nothing less than Donkey Kong ’94. I’ve been capturing footage for the Donkey Kong NES retrospective episode of Good Nintentions, and this process has reminded me how danged great the Game Boy remake/sequel/reinvention was. Seriously, it’s exceptional. So! I’ll spend an hour farting around with it tonight, maybe make some progress, who knows.

The stream will go live at 5:30 p.m. ET (that’s 2:30 p.m. PT and Super Gol-danged Late GMT) on my YouTube channel. Or, you know, you could just watch it here.

This is, of course, a Gintendo stream. Tonight’s drink will be a gin and tonic made with Cardinal American Dry gin, which is distilled here in North Carolina — like the saying goes, “Think globally, drink locally.” Or something like that. And if you enjoy this follow-up test stream and would like to help make it a regular, weekly affair, it’s the next funding goal for the Retronauts Video Chronicles campaign. (There’s less than $200 to go before I commit myself to streaming once or twice a week.)

1 Comment

Filed under Gintendo, Video

Stream complete: G.I. Joe features in the Gintendo test run [Archived]

The next funding goal for the Retronauts Video Chronicles will be weekly live streams — and not just live streams, but the “Gintendo” streams I’ve been threatening to produce for the past few months. You guys thought it was a Twitter joke, but I meant it! The idea should, hopefully, be somewhat self-explanatory: I play a classic game and sip a libation of some sort. (Not necessarily gin, though that’s definitely my preferred substance to abuse.)

We haven’t quite hit that mark yet, but it’s only about $150/mo. away and I feel pretty confident that the rad people of the internet will make it happen. So tonight will be a test run in a number of respects. I’ve never used YouTube for streaming before, nor have I streamed anything since rearranging my office setup last month. I figure the Friday evening of a holiday weekend is probably the best possible time to attempt to try a dry run for something so fraught with technical concerns and learning curves.

The stream is now archived here:

But please be patient, as this will definitely be a “working out the kinks” kind of stream.

  • Tonight’s game of choice will be G.I. Joe: A Real American Hero, developed by Kid and published by Taxan for NES.
  • Tonight’s beverage of choice will be a negroni made with Barr Hill honey gin. (Equal parts gin, Carpano Antica vermouth, and Campari, shaken with ice and enjoyed up.)

I will share whatever knowledge I have for both as I enjoy them together. Assuming setup complications don’t get the best of me, that is. Please watch and play along… or drink along… or both… or neither. Really, the choice is yours.

9 Comments

Filed under Gintendo, Video